Related Topic: Wildlife

IAEA tests drone to fight disease-carrying mosquitos

IAEA tests drone to fight disease-carrying mosquitos

The IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations have successfully tested releasing sterile mosquitos from drones as part of efforts to suppress the insect that spreads Zika and other diseases.

Energy & Environment 19 April 2018


Entergy files suit over Indian Point objection

Entergy files suit over Indian Point objection

Indian Point 48Entergy has asked a US federal court to reject New York State's objection to coastal certification of Indian Point, which it says was intended to block a renewal of the nuclear power plant's operating licence.

Regulation & Safety 21 January 2016


Russia approves nuclear and radiation safety program

Russia approves nuclear and radiation safety program

The Russian government has approved the federal target program (FTP) for nuclear and radiation safety for 2016-2020 and the period up to 2030, Russian news agency Nuclear.Ru reported today, citing an unnamed source at Rosatom.

Nuclear Policies 17 November 2015


Chernobyl supports 'abundant' mammal life, says new study

Chernobyl supports 'abundant' mammal life, says new study

A scientific study has for the first time demonstrated that, regardless of potential radiation effects on individual animals, the Chernobyl exclusion zone supports an abundant mammal community after nearly three decades of chronic radiation exposures. The study, conducted by scientists from Belarus, Japan, the UK and the USA was published yesterday in the journal Current Biology.

Energy & Environment 06 October 2015


Torsten returned to the wild

Torsten returned to the wild

Torsten 79x48A seal named Torsten has been released after a three-month stay in an intake pond at Sweden's Oskarshamn nuclear power plant.

Other News 13 February 2015


Biosphere reserve for Chernobyl

Biosphere reserve for Chernobyl

Pripyat wildlife 48Ukraine expects to prepare soon a draft presidential decree on establishing a biosphere reserve in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Energy & Environment 07 August 2014


Bradwell welcomes falcon chicks

Bradwell welcomes falcon chicks

Bradwell Peregrine Falcans 48Decommissioning work plans at the UK's shuttered Bradwell nuclear power plant have been adjusted so as not to disturb a clutch of peregrine falcon chicks. The nestlings recently hatched on top of one of the two reactor buildings.

Other News 21 June 2013


Peach Bottom recognised for habitat work

Peach Bottom recognised for habitat work

Staff at Exelon's Peach Bottom nuclear power station have been recognised by the Wildlife Habitat Council for their work in creating wildlife preservation areas and helping to stem the global tide of biodiversity loss.

Energy & Environment 06 January 2011


Sellafield mulls gull cull

Sellafield mulls gull cull

A plan is under consideration to cull seagulls at the Sellafield nuclear site in northern England amid concerns that some have been swimming in open-air storage ponds containing plutonium and radioactive waste, The Times newspaper reported. "They fly in and float around on the open waste ponds and act as a gateway to poison the wider area," claimed Martin Forwood of anti-nuclear group Cumbrians Opposed to a Radioactive Environment (CORE). Ali McKibbin, media relations manager at Sellafield, said that, while a mass cull is under discussion, the seagull problem was "under control", that there was no danger to the public and any methods used to kill the birds would be humane. She said that drugged bait would probably be the method used, although no final decision had yet been made. McKibbin added, "A professional pest control organization is employed to manage the number of gulls. All activities are done under licence in a safe and humane manner that causes the gulls minimum distress and suffering." She noted that some 350 animal carcasses - mostly birds but also some small mammals - were being stored in an industrial freezer at Sellafield as, under Environment Agency rules, any animal that dies on the site must be treated as nuclear waste as it may have been exposed to radiation. They will eventually be disposed of in a special landfill facility at Sellafield.

Other News 26 February 2010


Nuclear plant saved from swarm

Nuclear plant saved from swarm

Nuclear sites are often havens for wildlife, but Britain's Sellafield proved too popular recently when a swarm of 40,000 bees descended on its Waste Encapsulation Plant. The main entrance near where the bees had gathered was immediately closed, and pest control specialists were summoned to neutralise the insect threat. However, the tiny creatures were saved from doom by the quick thinking of Tony Calvin, manufacturing manager at the neighbouring Magnox Encapsulation Plant. An amateur bee-keeper for ten years, Calvin raced home to fetch his specialised equipment before tempting the swarm to a new hive and moving them to a more becoming environment.

Other News 22 August 2008